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Dr Jeremy Howick

Senior Research Associate, Faculty of Philosophy.
Research Fellow, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences.
Fellow of Kellogg College

jeremy.howick@phc.ox.ac.uk

Kellogg College
Banbury Road; Oxford; OX2 6PN

Research Interests

1. Philosophy of Science
2. Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics
3. Placebos: Epistemology and Ethics
4. Evidence-based Medicine
5. Clinical epidemiology


Personal webpage

http://www.phc.ox.ac.uk/team/researchers/jeremy-howick

Jeremy Howick

Contact Address:

2nd Floor
New Radcliffe House
Walton Street
Jericho
Oxford OX2 6NW


Career and Education

2008 London School of Economics PhD Philosophy of Science
2008 London School of Economics PGCert Teaching Higher Education
1997 London School of Economics MSc Philosophy of Science
1996 University of Oxford Grad. Diploma Philosophy
1992 Dartmouth College BA Engineering


PUBLICATIONS

Books

Howick J (2011). The Philosophy of Evidence-Based Medicine. Oxford: Blackwell-Wiley. (cited by 36 as of 18 January 2012)


Articles - Philosophy

Howick J, Glasziou P, Aronson JK (2013). Why mechanisms rarely bridge the gap between randomized trials and ‘target’ populations: a reply to Cartwright. Accepted for publication in Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, forthcoming.

Howick J (2012). Exposing the vanities – and a qualified defense – of mechanistic reasoning in health care decision making. Philosophy of Science, 78(5):926-940.

Howick J (2009). Questioning the Methodologic Superiority of ‘Placebo’ Over ‘Active’ Controlled Trials. American Journal of Bioethics 9(9):34-48. (cited by 15 as of 10 November 2011.)

Howick J (2009). Reviewing the Unsubstantiated Claims for the Methodological Superiority of 'Placebo' over 'Active' Controlled Trials: Reply to Open Peer Commentaries. American Journal of Bioethics 9(9): W5-W7.

Howick J (2009). If children understand drawing straws and flipping coins, research participants can understand randomization. American Journal of Bioethics 9(2): 19-20. (Cited by 2 as of 10 November 2011.)

Howick J (2008). Double-Blinding: the benefits and risks of being kept in the dark. In series: Contingency and Dissent in Science Technical Report 03/08. D. Fennell (ed). London: Contingency And Dissent in Science Project.

Howick J (2008). Philosophical Issues in Evidence-Based Medicine: Evaluating the Epistemological Role of Double Blinding and Placebo Controls. PhD thesis. London: London School of Economics.


Articles - Medicine

Howick J, Friedemann C, Watson R, Tsakok M, Tsakok T, Flemming S, Perera R, Heneghan C (2013). Comparative Effectiveness of Placebos and Treatments: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS One 8(5): e62599. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0062599

Howick J, Bishop FL, Heneghan C, Wolstenholme J, Stevens S, et al. (2013) Placebo Use in the United Kingdom: Results from a National Survey of Primary Care Practitioners. PLoS One 8(3): e58247. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058247

Goldet G, Howick J (2013). Understanding GRADE: an Introduction. Journal for Evidence-Based Medicine 6(1): 50-54.

Howick J, Glasziou P, Aronson JK (2013). Can understanding mechanisms solve the problem of extrapolating from study to target populations (the problem of ‘external validity’)? Accepted for publication in Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 106(3): 81-86.

Heneghan C, Howick J, O'Neill B, Gill PJ, Lasserson DS, Cohen D, Davis R, Ward A, Smith A, Jones G, et al. (2012). The evidence underpinning sports performance products: A systematic assessment. BMJ Open 2(4).

Heneghan C, Howick J, Gill P, O'Neill B, Lasserson D, Thake M, Thompson M (2012). Mythbusting sports and exercise products. BMJ 345:e4848

Heneghan C, Thompson M, Perera-Salazar R, Gill P, O'Neill B, Nunan D, Howick J, Lasserson D, Mahtani K (2012). Clarification from EFSA Reply. BMJ 345.

Heneghan C, Thompson M, Perera-Salazar R, Gill P, O'Neill B, Nunan D, Howick J, Lasserson D, Mahtani K (2012). Authors' reply to Betts, Stokes, and Kleiner. BMJ 345:e5431

Howick J. Saying things the "right" way: avoiding "nocebo" effects and providing full informed consent. Am J Bioeth 12(3):33-34 2012

Howick J (2011). A call to arms for taking proxy placebos seriously. BMJ; 343:d4345

OCEBM Levels of Evidence Working Group (2011). The Oxford 2011 Levels of Evidence. Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine.

Howick J, Chalmers, et al. (2011). Explanation of the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) Table of Evidence (Background Document). Oxford, Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine.

Howick J, Chalmers, et al. (2011). Introduction to the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) Table of Evidence. Oxford, Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine.

Golomb B, Erickson L, Sack S, Koperski S, Enkin M, and Howick J (2010). What's in Placebos: Who Knows? Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials. Annals of Internal Medicine 153(8):532-535. (cited by 15 as of 18 January 2012.)

Howick J (2010). Evidence-based mechanistic reasoning. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 103(11): 433-441. (Cited by 6 as of 18 January 2012.)

Howick J, Glasziou P, and Aronson J (2009). The evolution of evidence hierarchies: what can Bradford Hill's 'guidelines for causation' contribute? Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 102(5): 186-194. (Cited by 13 as of 18 January 2012.)

Howick J. (2009). Placebo misery. Escaping from placebo prison. BMJ 338: b1898.

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